A crucial part of IPA's mission is to inform member associations and the wider global publishing community about breaking developments which will impact publishers. We do this through a number of channels. the IPA website, our monthly e-newsletter, press releases and the IPA's dedicated social media feeds.

Inclusive Publishing has embarked on a series of interviews with industry leaders and their approach to accessibility. In August 2018 they interviewed IPA VP and Manual Moderno CEO, Hugo Setzer.

If you are serious about inclusive publishing, making it public and having a policy is the first step. It will allow you to inform and align forces within the company and to keep your commitment.

Why is inclusive publishing important to you and your organization?

First, I am convinced it is the right thing to do. For two years in a row our company has been included in the list of the Best Workplaces for Diversity and Inclusion in Mexico (Great Place to Work, Mexico) and we are convinced inclusion is not only important for our people, but for our customers as well. In addition, the International Publishers Association, where I am currently serving as Vice-President, fully supports and promotes accessible publishing. Our President, Michiel Kolman, is on the board of the Accessible Books Consortium.

Do you have a top tip for others new to accessibility?

Get started. Confucius said that a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. Stay consistent and, as Huw Alexander from SAGE says, don’t worry about failing once in a while, you will. Learn from others.

What do you wish you knew about accessibility 5 or 10 years ago?

I would have liked to be more aware about the importance of accessible publishing for persons with a visual disability. A colleague in my company, who is blind, had her family read out her textbooks in college for her so that she was able to major in communications. There were no accessible books available at the time.

What do you think will be the biggest game changer for inclusive publishing in the next few years?

I think technology for one thing, but I am also confident the landscape will change dramatically. Today less than 10% of publications are available in accessible formats. With all the efforts from so many publishers around the world, I am sure that number will show a sharp increase in the very near future.

For those still on the fence, why should they consider accessibility?

As mentioned, it is the right thing to do. But I am convinced it also makes perfect business sense. We have expanded our potential customer base and by improving the accessibility of our content, we are able to produce better e-books as well.

How have good inclusive publishing practices influenced the majority of your readers?

As we are only starting this journey, that is something we don’t know yet, but we expect it will have a positive impact. As consumers, we no longer just buy the cheapest product, we also want to make sure the company which produces it is aware and socially responsible.

Why should companies consider publishing a policy on Inclusive Publishing?

If you are serious about inclusive publishing, making it public and having a policy is the first step. It will allow you to inform and align forces within the company and to keep your commitment.

Can you sum up your attitude towards inclusive publishing in one sentence?

Inclusive publishing is the right thing to do.

Do you have any final thoughts on accessibility or inclusive publishing practices you would like to share?

Don’t try to do everything immediately. Choose the titles which are best suited for inclusive publishing. In our company, for example, we have some profusely illustrated medical textbooks, which are not the best candidates for making them accessible, but there are many others that are.

 

First published on August 6, 2018 on Inclusive Publishing. Reprinted with kind permission.

Inclusive publishing is the methodology and practice of creating a single accessible publication which can be enjoyed by everyone, including people with print disabilities like low vision, blindness and reading differences like dyslexia.

The International Publishers Association supports and encourages publishers to build mainstream accessibility into their content workflows so that they can provide content at the same time, same price and in the same format for everyone whether they have a print disability or not. This is known as “Inclusive Publishing” and has benefits for all parties involved.

By adopting inclusive publishing, a single mainstream ebook format can provide significant benefits:

• All readers get a publication they can access in whichever way they need, irrespective of print disabilities
• Charitable organizations save valuable resources not having to rework publications to make them accessible
• Publishers produce standards driven resources which can be marketed to a wider market

Inclusive publishing is the future of mainstream and specialist publishing extending the longevity of your digital resources and improving the user experience for all your readers.

Visit inclusivepublishing.org for guidance, news, information and support in your endeavours.

 

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